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Top Five Women in Health IT

I had recently been put in touch with an article written by Katie Matlack, called “The Top 5 Women in Health IT You Should Know."  In the article, Matlack shines light on five spectacular women who play a major role in the healthcare IT industry today and who will continue to play a major role in the future.

The top 5 women in Matlack’s list include: Regina Holliday, Judith Faulkner, Susannah Fox, Halle Tecco, and Amy Sheng.  Five women who have come from all different backgrounds, have each taken a step forward and together taken one giant leap for the healthcare industry.    

Holliday, inspired by her late husband’s struggle to get appropriate care for kidney cancer, focuses on Meaningful Use requirements that doctors must meet to qualify for federal grants.  Holliday is known to speak her mind at conferences such as HIMSS12 and TEDMED. 

Faulkner launched a well known EMR system in the late 70’s and is responsible for developing one of the first personal health records.  Faulkner sits on President Obama’s HIT Policy Committee and continues to expand her influence on EHR systems.

Susannah Fox regularly blogs and helps researchers understand the habits of patients so that health IT can better support them.  Thanks to her, the healthcare industry understands that 13% of adults have gone online to find other people who might have the same health concerns similar to theirs.

Halle Tecco is an inspiration to those who would like to get more involved in health technology, but who might not have a strong background in it.  She continues to encourage new thinking about health care to developers and programmers who don’t have a history in health information technology.

Amy Sheng is one of the creators of a technology that uses optical attachments that turn smart-phones into diagnostic-quality imaging systems.  With the growing number of smart phones users, this takes EHR Software to a whole new level. 

As a woman who recently started working in world of Health IT, I find it inspiring to learn about the women who are taking large strides to succeed in a field where women are generally underrepresented.  Hopefully, others will be inspired and greater things can come for the world of Health IT.  I’d like to thank Katie Matlack for sharing this article with me.

 To view the original article, click here.